ACL injuries on the rise amongst young Australians

A recent report has indicated that knee reconstructions are on the rise in Australia. Specifically ACL injuries. ACL stands for anterior cruciate ligament, and its basic purpose is to stabilise the knee.

 

Damage to the ACL typically happens when someone changes direction at speed while playing sport, this can happen in many sports but some of the most common are Netball, AFL and rugby. Obviously these three sports are incredibly popular in Australia, and so it is no wonder why there are high rates of these injuries reported by Australians. In fact, Australia has the highest rates of knee reconstruction in the world.

 

 

This is concerning many health professionals, because the operation and subsequent rehab can be quite expensive, and in Australia, where the cost of medical bills are largely shared amongst the population this becomes a public health issue.

 

 

With close to 200,000 ACL reconstructions being performed in Australia between 2000 and 2015, at an average cost of $8,364, the cost of these operations can add up quickly.

 

ACL injury is also a largely preventable injury, and because ACL tears typically cause long term disability and damage to the knee it is very important that young Australians take care of their knees. Particularly if they are active or play sport.

 

There are a variety of exercises you can do to take care of your ACL, for more information on this you should contact a physiotherapist or your local GP for a referral

Julian talks to Kate Clancy from the Horse Experience

Julian was lucky enough to have a chat with Horse extraordinaire, Kate Clancy, from the Horse Experience to find out exactly what the attraction has to offer. Head to the Davidson Plaza every day at 10:30, 11:30, 1:30, 2:30 and 3:30 to learn from Kate and a number of guest speakers about different breeds of horses and the best ways to take care of them. Also, at 1pm daily, you can have a photo taken with a real cowboy in the ‘Meet a Cowboy’ Zone out the front of the Davidson Plaza.

Enjoy hearing all about the Horse Experience in this special extended interview!

Speedy Shearers Showcase Superb Skills this Sydney Royal Easter Show

The shearing is a mainstay of the Sydney Royal Easter Show, and this year will be no different. Shearing is something that all Australians have heard of, but many know little about, if that sounds like you, then you’re in luck.

This year there is a fresh flock of sheep ready to be sheared for your viewing pleasure and you can rest assured the shearers will be eager to showcase their sensational skills at this years Sydney Royal Easter Show.

As well as shearing the sheep, you can hear tails of life on the land and listen as the shearers explain the inner workings of the shearing shed.

If you’re game, you’ll even be invited in to take the reigns, or clippers, and help one of the experts shear a sheep.

You can catch the shearing at the The Daily Telegraph Paddock from Friday the 23rd through to Wednesday the 28th of March. Or from the 29th of March till the 3rd of April at the Sheep and Wool Pavilion.

Image: WikiCommons

It’s Time to Start Horsing Around! Equestrian Events at The Sydney Royal Easter Show 

Equestrian Competitions are a hallmark of the Royal Sydney Easter Show, and you can rest assured equestrian has something for the whole family.  

 

 

Whether your interest is watching riders perform gymnastics routines on top of a horse in the vaulting, or you would rather spend time browsing some more exotic horses in the breeding contests, you can rest assured equestrian has something for everyone. 

The Vaulting is on at the Schmidt Arena on the 30th of March. You can catch a breeding events any day of the show. Some of the other equestrian events are show jumping, hacks, leading reign and many more with locations and times for the events being available in the Royal Sydney Easter Show program or on the website.  

 

 

Be sure to watch an equestrian event at this years Sydney Royal Easter Show, you’ll be glad that you did! 

 

Images: WikiCommons